Survey Analysis (Part 2): Mobile App Marketing

This is part 2 of my analysis of the data collected from a survey I conducted a few weeks ago. Last week I published the survey results in the form of an infographic. Part 1 of my analysis was published in a blog post earlier this week.

Forty-one survey participants were asked about the marketing activities that they have pursued in the past, as well as the marketing activities that they intend to pursue in the future. When asked about their plans for marketing an upcoming app release, 82.5% intended to pursue marketing activities. This is a sharp increase compared to only 47% of the participants pursuing marketing activities in the past. Two-thirds of the survey respondents who did not pursue marketing previously are now planning to do so.

In terms of who will carry out the marketing activities, there is a decrease in the proportion of respondents planning on undertaking the marketing activities themselves. A larger proportion are opting for the services of a marketing consultant (contractor) or agency instead.

This shift is also reflected in the planned marketing spend. There is an increase in the proportion of the respondents planning on spending in the $100-$999 and the $3,000-$9,999 budget ranges – the same spending levels incurred by the respondents who previously enlisted the help of a marketing consultant (contractor) or agency previously.

A smaller proportion of survey respondents are now planning on issuing press releases. However there is an increase in the proportion of survey respondents planning to engage directly with review websites and press outlets. There is also a small decrease in the proportion of the respondents pursuing offline advertising and other marketing activities, such as social media campaigns or blogger outreach.

What does this data tell us?

My data shows that there’s an increased awareness and willingness for app entrepreneurs to invest in marketing. With roughly 700,000 apps available in the App Store and Google Play, the competition for app consumers is fierce. In a virtual store with unlimited shelf space, even the most innovative and differentiated apps can go unnoticed by the consumers. VisonMobile found that for the group of app developers who market and promote their mobile apps, 60% were able to generate enough revenue to break even; whereas in the group of app developers that do not market and promote their mobile apps, only 20% of the app developers generated enough revenue to break even.

Category : mobile